Posted by: Moira Drexler | June 19, 2011

AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION – FLORENCE AMERICAN CEMETERY AND MEMORIAL.

On a recent trip to Tuscany, we took time to visit the Florence American Cemetery and Memorial.  It is not something we planned to do but when we noticed a sign, we thought it would be worth a visit.  It is situated on the Greve River and approximately 15 kilometres south of Florence.  It is framed by hills and is beautifully presented.

A peaceful setting surrounded by soft rolling hills, the Florence American Cemetery and Memorial, Italy.

The headstones form a gentle curve that fits with the surroundings and makes it very peaceful.

There are 4,398 tombstones here.  The visit provoked many questions from our children.  We did our best to answer some very difficult questions.

There are a total of 4,322 latin crosses in this cemetery.

There are 76 Stars of David at the cemetery.

The children were fascinated to learn that Jewish people traditionally don’t bring flowers to a grave but rather a stone.  You can see the stone on this grave.

At the back of the cemetery, there is a large wall with 1,409 names of missing persons.

List of missing persons.

A tall column stands at the front of the memorial and at the top there is a sculpture representing the spirit of peace and the figure is holding olive branches.

The monument and Spirit of Peace Column.

The figure watches over the graves.

Spirit of Peace in Tuscany.

A word on Freedom at the Florence American cemetery.

And lastly, teaching the children about the atrocities of war is important so they learn that this should never be repeated.  Seeing just this one cemetery with  the 4,398 tombstones was overwhelming when you think of the millions who lost their lives.

Another perspective.

If you are interested in American overseas military cemeteries, look at the website:  www.abmc.gov

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Responses

  1. I have not been there. I will look for it. I find these places so sad when you think of all those young lives lost.

  2. It is well worth the visit. It is tragic but important that history is not forgotten.


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